Why I’m Paying Attention to LinkedIn

Seven Takeaways for Marketers
Tracy Bains LinkedIn profile
I’m an avid user of LinkedIn—one of over 120 million professionals from more than 200 countries and territories who have signed up to manage their business identity, keep current with industry news, or search for jobs on this social network.

But when I put together a marketing plan, LinkedIn isn’t necessarily the first place I think to advertise. Since I work in the non-profit sector—higher education by day, community development by night—it hasn’t been a natural fit.

At least that’s what I thought entering this week’s LinkedIn Marketing Innovation session in Vancouver. After spending a couple of hours learning more about this platform, I’m starting to mull over how I can use LinkedIn’s sophisticated customer segmentation for my business needs. At the very least, it’s important to keep up-to-speed on what’s possible on this platform—even if I can’t apply that knowledge immediately.

Seven Takeaways

  1. At Ad Week this year, LinkedIn will announce a new feature: Company Pages will allow status updates similar to how you can post what you’re doing on your personal profile.
  2. LinkedIn’s ability to target customers is unparalleled, leading to precise segmentation by profession, gender, title, seniority, age, industry, connection size, company size, company name, geography, group targeting, education, language and influence.
  3. In Canada, a minimum budget to be effective is $10,000. This applies to campaigns that involve custom polls, banner ads or sponsored messages via InMail.
  4. A self-serve portal allows even marketers with small budgets like me to access some of LinkedIn’s power.
  5. There are nearly one million Groups on LinkedIn—some good, some bad. If you’re considering starting a Group, consider the fact that you’ll likely need to pay for advertising to attract followers.
  6. Interactive LinkedIn Content Ads are morphing banner ads into microsites, featuring rich opportunities for engagement like videos, webcasts and content for download.
  7. Build your Company Page—you own this space so use it strategically to share your story, including a showcase for your Products and Services.

Do your marketing efforts include LinkedIn? Share your wins, lessons and wish list items below.

It’s the Story, Stupid: Content Marketing

I’m back home after spending a couple of days at a content marketing retreat on Whidbey Island hosted by the Langley Center for New Media.

Storytelling was the kernel in every presenter’s session—from the mechanics and psychology of storytelling to measuring its impact. Forget key messages and feature-benefit adspeak—it’s about the story, stupid.

For a pithy round-up of key ideas, see Kathy Hanbury’s blog post 28 Content Marketing Tips from the Content Marketing Masters. Or take a look at Drew Davis’s adept curation of the retreat’s key tweets, presentations and pix via Storify.

Storify screen shot
Screen shot of Storify created by Drew Davis

I peeked over Drew’s shoulder a few times while he assembled the page on Storify. “Note to self,” I thought, “look up this tool.” So when I came home, I read Storify Wants to Pull Stories from the Stream, a review on GigaOM.

Funnily, I think Storify neatly captures the mood of the retreat and our hyper-focus on storytelling. “Turn what people post on social media into compelling stories,” reads the tagline on Storify’s homepage.

Co-founder Burt Herman adds, “We’re coming at it from the point of view of story-telling — it’s about creating a really rich experience about an event. There are all of these real-time updates, so many that we are drowning in them. This is about finding relevance in the noise.” (Source: GigaOM)

Aggregating, curating and creating content are top of mind for many professionals these days. For me, Storify is emblematic of the zeitgeist, a reflection of how journalists (and marketers) are re-inventing how we tell stories in a digital age.

So are you a believer or is this just a new round of gurus, books and webcasts?